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Baby Boomer Sexuality During World Sexual Health Month

As you may know, September is World Sexual Health month, a collaborative effort between the World Association for Sexual Health and the World Health Organization. The American Sexual Health Association will be focusing on a number of areas in the US, one of which is Baby Boomer Sexuality.

baby-Boomer-Sexuality-world-sexual-health-month

Sexual health is defined as:

Sexual health is a state of physical, emotional, mental and social wellbeing in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity. Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence. For sexual health to be attained and maintained, the sexual rights of all persons must be respected, protected and fulfilled. (Source)

I think it’s just fabulous that boomer sex is finally getting some attention! Of course, part of the focus is on helping older adults who have challenges with sex. But, I want to encourage us to think about all the positive ways we can enhance our own sexual health. And, what we can do to help change attitudes about sex and female sexuality in our country. Too often we hear about shaming and name-calling when women express their wants and desires. Remember Rush Limbaugh calling a young woman a slut for asking about coverage for birth control?

We are a powerful demographic, with the capacity to bring about a change in attitude. We have daughters and sons, and grandchildren who look up to us and with whom we can have conversations about what it means to live a sex-positive life.

Sexual health is more than taking care of our private parts or seeing the doctor for annual check-ups. Sexual health is also about our emotional connection to our sexuality. It means learning to accept and acknowledge our desires. We can communicate our needs to partners and be able to have the kind of sex we want. Without shame or censure.

What can we do? In my recent article, World Sexual Health-Let’s Practice and Promote Pleasure, I shared my plan for promoting sexual health: I will write on the topic all month, read a few new educational books, and take time to explore my own pleasure and desire.

What will you do to improve your sexual health?

At a lost as to where to begin? Here are a few ideas:

  • Get a pap smear and gynecological check-up if you haven’t done that in over a year.
  • Ask a question you’ve been afraid to ask. If you want, email me .
  • Write down or share with a partner something you’d like to try but have been afraid to ask for.
  • The next time you hear someone make a sex-shaming remark, point it out and ask him or her to stop.
  • Do a sexy dance in your kitchen when no one is looking.
  • Or…perform a sexy dance for a partner or lover.
  • Read a sexy book.
  • Touch yourself.
  • Get out a mirror and check out your vulva. Then check out The Great Wall of Vagina, an artist’s exhibit of plaster casts of vulva (not really vaginas!) A beautiful array of shapes and sizes-there is no ‘normal’.
  • Create a plan for pleasure!

I’ll be sharing ideas, stories and a few book reviews to promote Sexual Health awareness all month long at walkerthornton.com

Now it’s your turn to share!

Walker Thornton

We are delighted to have Walker Thornton as our Women’s Sexual Health columnist. After working for over 10 years in the field of sexual violence against women, Walker is now enjoying a new career as a freelance writer, public speaker, and sex educator with an emphasis on midlife women. Her blog, <a>WalkerThornton.com </a> was ranked #5 by Kinkly.com in their top 100 Sex Blogging Superheroes of 2014. You can connect with her on <a>Facebook </a> and <a href="http://twitter.com/WalkerThornton">Twitter</a> For questions about sexual health, write her at [email protected]

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